Other ways of giving

There are lots of ways you can raise money for Education Support Partnership, whether it's taking part in an organised sporting event, to holding your own event. We have got lots of ideas to help you get inspired.

If you’d prefer to donate another way, please call us on 020 7697 2750, email us at fundraising@edsupport.org.uk or write to us here.

Leave a legacy

Teacher helping a student

Leaving a legacy to us secures the vital support that everyone working in education needs sometimes to survive the demands of this uniquely challenging job.

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Pension giving

A regular gift through your pension is a wonderful way to support us. Last year we received 35% of our income from the generosity of retired teachers and lecturers.

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Fundraise for us

Cupcake cases for bake sales

There are lots of ways you can raise money from taking part in an organised sporting event, to organising your own tea-party or open garden.
 

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How your money helps

Your donations help make sure those in crisis have somewhere to turn at any hour of the day or night. On occasion it can even be the difference between life and death. Take a look at these case studies to see the incredible difference your donation can make.

Kurt's story

Kurt - grant for teachers

With his trusty salmon pink Fender guitar Kurt Theobald teaches music of all kinds in schools and colleges on a peripatetic basic. But with cutbacks in arts provision at many schools he found himself struggling to make ends meet. He contacted Help Musicians which put him in touch with Ed Support.

Read my story

Nicola’s story

Housing crisis affecting teachers

Nicola, a teaching assistant at a primary school and single parent, had her life thrown into chaos when she was told she owed money due to an over payment of Housing Benefit. This threw her into confusion and extreme distress. We gave her a grant to help tide her over.

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Alan's story

Headteacher wellbeing - Alan's story

Primary headteacher Alan was about to leave teaching after more than 20 years in the profession. But with our help he found there was light at the end of the tunnel.

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Angela's story

University careers adviser wellbeing

It’s common for people to feel stressed because they have too much work. But what happens when you don’t have enough to do? That may sound like bliss. In fact, it can be very stressful as university careers adviser Angela explains.

Read my story